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What Is a Peptide? Definition and Examples
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What Is a Peptide? Definition and Examples

A peptide is a molecule consisting of two or more amino acids linked together by peptide bonds. The general structure of an amino acid is: R-CH(NH 2 )COOH. Each amino acid is a monomer that forms a peptide polymer chain with other amino acids when the carboxyl group (-COOH) of one amino acid reacts with the amino group (-NH 2 ) of another amino acid, forming a covalent bond between the amino acid residues and releasing a molecule of water.

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Chart of the Presidents and Vice Presidents

The first line of Article II Section 1 of the US Constitution states, "The executive power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America." With these words, the office of the president was established. Since 1789 and the election of George Washington, America's first president, 44 individuals have served as the Chief Executive of the United States.
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Armature

( Noun ) - In art, an armature is an underlying, unseen, supporting component (usually of wood or metal) for something else. Armatures are useful in sculpture, lost-wax casting (to help make the initial model three-dimensional) and even stop-motion animation puppets. Think of the chicken wire frame upon which plaster or papier mache strips are affixed in a sculpture, to get a mental visual.
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The History of Pencils, Markers, Pens, and Erasers

Ever wonder how your favorite writing implement was invented? Read on to learn about the history of pencils, erasers, sharpeners, markers, highlighters and gel pens and see who invented and patented these writing instruments. Pencil History Graphite is a form of carbon, first discovered in the Seathwaite Valley on the side of the mountain Seathwaite Fell in Borrowdale, near Keswick, England, sometime around 1564 by an unknown person.
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George Washington's First Inauguration

The inauguration of George Washington as the first President of the United States on April 30, 1789, was a public event witnessed by a cheering crowd. The celebration in the streets of New York City was also a very serious event, however, as it marked the beginning of a new era. After struggling with the Articles of Confederation in the years following the Revolutionary War, there had been a need for a more effective federal government and a convention in Philadelphia in the summer of 1781 created the Constitution, which established the office of president.
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How Many Supreme Court Justices Are There?

There are nine members of the Supreme Court, and that number has been unchanged since 1869. The number and length of the appointments are set by statute, and the U.S. Congress has the ability to change that number. In the past, changing that number was one of the tools that Congress used to rein in a president they didn't like.
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The Consequences of the Norman Conquest

The success of William of Normandy (1028-1087)'s Norman Conquest of 1066, when he seized the crown from Harold II (1022-1066), was once credited with bringing in a host of new legal, political and social changes to England, effectively marking 1066 as the start of a new age in English history. Historians now believe the reality is more nuanced, with more inherited from the Anglo-Saxons, and more developed as a reaction to what was happening in England, rather than the Normans simply recreating Normandy in their new land.
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Claiming Irish Citizenship Through Your Irish Ancestors

Can you think of a better way to honor your Irish family heritage than by becoming an Irish citizen? If you have at least one parent, grandparent or, possibly, a great-grandparent who was born in Ireland then you may be eligible to apply for Irish citizenship. Dual citizenship is permitted under Irish law, as well as under the laws of many other countries such as the United States, so you may be able to claim Irish citizenship without surrendering your current citizenship (dual citizenship).
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Homosexuality in Ancient Rome

Although sexual practices are often left out of discussions of history, the fact remains that homosexuality in ancient Rome did exist. However, it's not quite as cut and dried as a question of "gay versus straight." Instead, it's a much more complex cultural perspective, in which the approval-or disapproval-of sexual activity was based upon the social status of the people performing various acts.
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Who Actually Invented the Macintosh Computer?

In December of 1983, Apple Computers ran its famous "1984" Macintosh television commercial on a small, unknown station solely to make the commercial eligible for awards. The commercial cost $1.5 million and only ran once in 1983, but news and talk shows everywhere replayed it, making TV history. The next month, Apple ran the same ad during the Super Bowl and millions of viewers saw their first glimpse of the Macintosh computer.
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Was Napoleon Bonaparte Really Short?

Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821) is chiefly remembered for two things in the English-speaking world: being a conqueror of no small ability and for being short. He still inspires devotion and hatred for winning a series of titanic battles, expanding an empire across much of Europe, and then destroying it all as a result of a failed invasion of Russia.
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History of Women's Basketball in America

Women's basketball began the year after the game was invented. The history of women's basketball success is a long one: collegiate and professional teams, intercollegiate competitions (and their critics) as well as the sad history of many failed attempts at professional leagues; women's basketball at the Olympics.
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Who Was Queen Seondeok of the Silla Kingdom?

Queen Seondeok ruled the Kingdom of Silla starting in 632, marking the first time a female monarch rose to power in Korean history - but certainly not the last. Unfortunately, much of the history of her reign, which took place during Korea's Three Kingdoms period, has been lost to time. Her story lives on in legends of her beauty and even occasional clairvoyance.
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Pre-Revolutionary France

In 1789, the French Revolution began a transformation of far more than just France, but Europe and then the world. It was the pre-revolutionary makeup of France that held the seeds of the circumstances for revolution, and affected how it was begun, developed, and-depending on what you believe-ended. Certainly, when the Third Estate and their growing followers swept away centuries of dynastic political tradition, it was the structure of France they were attacking as much as its principles.
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Who Invented the Electoral College?

Who invented the electoral college? The short answer is the founding fathers (aka the framers of the Constitution.) But if credit is to be given to one person, it's often attributed to James Wilson of Pennsylvania, who proposed the idea prior to the committee of eleven making the recommendation. However, the framework they put into place for the election of the nation's president is not only oddly undemocratic, but also opens the door to some quirky scenarios, such as a candidate who wins presidency without having captured the most votes.
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Northern Mockingbird Facts

The northern mockingbird ( Mimus polyglottos ) is a common sight in the United States, Central America, and the Caribbean. The bird's common and scientific names refer to its mimicking ability. The scientific name means "many-tongued mimic." Fast Facts: Northern Mockingbird Scientific Name: Mimus polyglottos Common Name: Northern mockingbird Basic Animal Group: Bird Size: 8-11 inches Weight: 1.
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What Is the Citizens United Ruling?

Citizens United is a nonprofit corporation and conservative advocacy group that successfully sued the Federal Election Commission in 2008, claiming its campaign finance rules represented unconstitutional restrictions on the First Amendment guarantee of freedom of speech. The U.S. Supreme Court's landmark decision ruled that the federal government cannot limit corporations - or, for that matter, unions, associations, or individuals - from spending money to influence the outcome of elections.
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Basic Solution Definition (Chemistry)

A basic solution is an aqueous solution containing more OH - ions than H + ions. In other words, it is an aqueous solution with a pH greater than 7. Basic solutions contain ions, conduct electricity, turn red litmus paper blue, and feel slippery to the touch. Examples of common basic solutions include soap or detergent dissolved in water or solutions of sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, or sodium carbonate.
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10 Things a Successful School Principal Does Differently

Being a principal has its challenges. It is not an easy profession. It is a high-stress job that most people are not equipped to handle. A principal's job description is broad. They have their hands in virtually everything related to students, teachers, and parents. They are the chief decision-maker in the building.
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